Tag Archives: Damien Gillis

2010 Fraser River Gravel Mining

Share

In February 2010, filmmaker Damien Gillis captured the gravel mining operations on the Fraser River with a team of expert biologists and local conservationists. Now, at the 11th hour, this year’s planned mining projects have been unexpectedly cancelled. The rationale given by DFO is logistical complications and low market prices for gravel, only confirming critics’ position that this program is not about reducing flood risks – and all about money. Watch this video to see what these huge mining operations really look like – and why the ecologically damaging program should be scrapped altogether. Be sure to check out this new report from common sense contributor Otto Langer on the subject as well.

Share

Video of 2010 Fraser River Gravel Mining as 2011 Program Cancelled!

Share

In February 2010, filmmaker Damien Gillis captured the gravel mining operations on the Fraser River with a team of expert biologists and local conservationists. Now, at the 11th hour, this year’s planned mining projects have been unexpectedly cancelled. The rationale given by DFO is logistical complications and low market prices for gravel, only confirming critics’ position that this program is not about reducing flood risks – and all about money. Watch this video to see what these huge mining operations really look like – and why the ecologically damaging program should be scrapped altogether. Be sure to check out this new report from common sense contributor Otto Langer on the subject as well.

Share

Mair & Gillis Take Back Our BC in Port Alberni Feb 19

Share

From the Alberni Valley Times – Feb 1, 2011

On what is being called a Townhall Tour for Common Sense Canadians,
Rafe Mair and Damien Gillis will visit Port Alberni to help educate
residents on issues faced by the province.

Mair and Gillis are
the founders of the popular new online journal, The Common Sense
Canadian – a voice for the public and environment.

Salmon,
rivers, oil tankers, democracy and the local Raven Coal mine and port
proposal are the subjects of the rousing tour Gillis and Mair are
making across B.C.

As a part of this tour of some 30 communities around the province,
Mair and Gillis are coming to the Alberni District Secondary School
auditorium on Saturday, Feb. 19 from 1 to 3 p.m.

They will be
joined by local host Stacey Gaiga of Coal Free Alberni and guest
speaker CoalWatch president John Snyder, with an update on the proposed
Rave Coal mine issue and actions citizens can take to help put a stop
to it.

The two-hour town hall event will feature Mair’s new short
documentary on the proposed Enbridge pipeline to B.C.’s North Coast,
“Oil in Eden,” and a key-note speech by Mair, plus the opportunity for
the audience to ask questions and discuss these issues with our
speakers.

The tour is designed to inform and empower British Columbians, while growing The Common Sense Canadian.

For
more information, please contact Stacey Gaiga at 250-723-1243 or by
e-mailing staceygaiga@shaw.ca. There is also a Facebook group, “Take
Back Our B.C.: Rafe Mair & Coal Port!”

Read original article

Share

Building Future of Salmon Farming… in 90 Sec

Share

On January 14, 2011, Agrimarine Holdings Inc. completed primary construction and installation of the world’s first marine closed-containment salmon farm (it has several freshwater-based tanks already in operation in China) at Middle Bay, near Campbell River. The event was the culmination of years of research to develop a more sustainable form of salmon aquaculture that – unlike the open net pen farms that dot BC’s coast – doesn’t dump its waste into the marine environment, and will minimize the transfer of parasites and pathogens between farmed and wild fish. Damien Gillis has been documenting the construction for Agrimarine and here condenses a two-week process into this 90 second time-lapse video.

The tank’s fibreglass and steel base is first mounted on a barge – which is then temporarily sunk in order to float the base. The buoyant base is pulled to the dock by tug boat, where the construction team begins bolting 24 fibreglass wall sections atop it. The completed tank is then tugged into place off the dock and attached by eight heavy-duty ropes to an underwater grid anchored to metal piles. Once secured, a 12-inch plug is removed from the bottom of the tank. Over the next two hours, water fills the tank as it sinks until mostly submerged. The top of the tank is suspended above the surface by foam-filled flotation cubes, attached beneath the top ring of the tank.

The company is now set to fill the tank with a first batch of Chinook salmon, and will soon be adding three more tanks to its Middle Bay operation.

Share

Audio: Damien Gillis on CHLY’s ‘Sense of Justice’

Share

Listen to this feature chat on Nanaimo-based CHLY’s Sense of Justice show with host Rae Kornberger. The Common Sense Canadian’s Damien Gillis discusses private river power, oil tankers, and making the environment a key issue in this pivotal year for BC politics.

Click here to listen – choose the “2011/01/12 a discussion of IPP’s” in the top left corner of the audio player. It my take a few seconds to load.

Share