Common Sense Canadian
 

Rafe to NDP: Now you’re the government…here’s what to expect that you’re not expecting

5
Posted July 21, 2017 by Rafe Mair in Politics
Share

NDP Premier John Horgan and his cabinet being sworn in by Lieutenant Governor Judith Guichon (Photo: Province of BC / Flickr)

In politics, speculation is half the fun – the other half is figuring out how, with all your experience in the field, you could have been so bloody wrong.

Actually, for the new minister, the reasons he or she is usually wrong are predictable as hell to a guy like me – not because I’m smart, but because I was there once myself. I went into my new Ministry office back on December 22, 1975, full of piss and vinegar, not to mention urgent plans. After all, I had 3 1/2 years of mismanagement to clean up and there’s no time to start like right now.

Well, yes, there is, you quickly find out from your Deputy Minister, because there are several decisions to make first. Not that they’re earth-shattering, just that not making them means you’re going to be pestered until you do. You need a good parking spot, preferably better than Vander Zalm’s, a key to your private loo lost by your predecessor, and clear instructions on how to replenish your liquor cabinet.

This turns out to be a good thing because you quickly learn that you need to take a bit longer getting acquainted, but it will have to wait a few days because, at the Premier’s request – well, not really a request – you’re flying out to Ottawa that afternoon with two colleagues to meet federal counterparts to straighten out an issue that the Premier pledged to clean up personally the moment he was sworn in.

When you get back to your office four days later, you discover that priorities you were going to deal with up front will have to come even later because you have a cabinet meeting you’re already late for and, afterwards, your deputy has arranged for you to tour your offices, show the flag, and meet the people who work for you. Cabinet runs late and you’re off to meet the 120 pissed off employees that didn’t leave at quitting time. Welcome to government, Mr. Minister.

A sticky problem

Former Minister and friend, Dr. Tom Perry and I were talking about this not long ago and agreed that if you’re lucky, you run into a sticky, double-headed problem right off the bat because it re-occurs with nauseating frequency and best you get used to it and have some practice dealing with it. I’ll make up an example because it’s just the kind that happened to me and, later, Tom.

A rancher is irate and won’t leave your office. Once a year he must drive his cattle over a faraway piece of unused land but the Agricultural Land Commission won’t permit it. Exceptions are routinely made in cases like this, so my Deputy Minister tells me, but they won’t budge. He is sure that a nudge from me will get the job done.

Then, prepare a suitable letter and I’ll sign it, I say. “Minister,” my deputy replies, “the trouble is he’s a regional director of the opposition party, hated by your party, and we know that if you do him a favour he’s going to raise hell with your party for doing him, the enemy, a favour you were under no obligation to do. Your cabinet colleagues will shun you, your constituency president will give you hell, and the Land Commission members will badly lose face and accuse you of usurping their sworn jurisdiction.” Shit!

The other scenario is exactly the same except the rancher is a bagman for your party, is the premier’s wife’s second cousin, and the Opposition is just waiting to pounce, big time! Shit!

If you don’t think this happens, you’ve never been in politics.

Out to get you

Actually, we’re all in for a huge adjustment and we should get ready – a good, stiff, single malt whiskey should do it.

Are you ready?

The Postmedia papers, the Sun and the Province, will have columnists, editorial writers, the editor of the Op-Ed page, the Canadian Taxpayers Federation and the Fraser Institute on high alert to pour it on this pack of Reds now running things and, at the suggestion of the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers, there will be a new feature in the Sun called “Oil and the Sun for everyone”. Resource Works – the BC LNG booster – will have a feature in the Province, their formal partners, called “Hey, hee, golly gee, LNG is good for ye, hotter weather for me and thee!”

Phil Hochstein will have a feature called  “Breaking the Union for Sun and Fun”, but Jimmy Pattison, having killed all the salmon, in a public display of contrition, will set up a benevolent society called Jimmy Pattison Pals in Poverty for fishermen, last place car salesmen and talk show hosts he’s known.

The biggest change will come in the media, of course, where the Masthead of the Vancouver Sun will holler, “Hating Horrible Horgan helps keep the climate crummy and casts comforting kisses to Coleman and Christy.”

The last big change may come when Damien sees this and puts his own masthead saying “Rafe’s Ready for Retirement”. [Publisher’s Note: You’re not getting off that easy, Rafe]

Share

About the Author

Rafe Mair

Rafe Mair, LL.B, LL.D (Hon) a B.C. MLA 1975 to 1981, was Minister of Environment from late 1978 through 1979. In 1981 he left politics for Talk Radio becoming recognized as one of B.C.'s pre-eminent journalists. An avid fly fisherman, he took a special interest in Atlantic salmon farms and private power projects as environmental calamities and became a powerful voice in opposition to them. Rafe is the co-founder of The Common Sense Canadian and writes a regular blog at rafeonline.com.

5 Comments


  1.  

    So far I like what I see. Horgan along with the Greens will stop the damned Site C project and turn back the Kinder Morgan expansion.They will ban big money from politics and hopefully bring forward a referendum on electoral reform. Once that is done we will have gone a long way to putting BC right side up again. That is if they can get that far with the one vote edge.




  2.  
    Rafe

    Ron – It will be interesting to see if premier Horgan has the jam too appoint a full judicial inquiry into BC Hydro. He should do such are the apparent facts. It’s not realistic to expect the public to see such a corporate calamity with all those liberal friends making so much money doing what Hydro used to do but charging three times as much without asking for an accounting. It is, after all, our money. You are also quite right that the attorney general’s ministry and at least one if not more attorneys general have questions to answer as well. The reason I am doubtful is that it would involve considerable risk for Gordon Campbell amongst others most of whom have great influence in the federal government which will probably, being liberal, want to come to everyone’s defense. The only reason I don’t mention Christy Clark is that I don’t believe she was bright enough to do any more then let Campbell’s policy drift. That, of course, is not good enough but politics is a pretty dirty game. There is another factor namely the governments are often loath to take on previous government’s for fear that when in due course they get back in they will turn up out and get even.




  3.  
    Salal

    Amen Ron.

    Thanks again Rafe. You still have your finger on the pulse.




  4.  
    ron wilton

    Clearing up the Lieberal breaches of trust should be a job for the RCMP not just John and the NDP, but then who will charge the RCMP for for their own dereliction of duty for not having dealt with the Christy criminality years ago.





Leave a Response


(required)